Holy Jesus Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne

The Holy Jesus Hospital is a working office Newcastle upon Tyne, England, in the care of the National Trust. It is a Grade II* listed building.
The site of the hospital has been in use for 700 years helping the townspeople. There was an Augustinian friary on the site from the thirteenth century, then an almshouse for housing retired freemen, then a soup kitchen was built next to Almshouse in the nineteenth century, before the site acquired its current function as a working office. The building also serves as the basis of the Inner City Project of the National Trust. This project takes people of ages 12–25 and over 50 out to the countryside in order to increase appreciation of the city's natural surroundings.
The building is of architectural interest because it still retains architectural elements from many previous centuries, including a 14th-century sacristy wall and 16th-century tower connected with the King's Council of the North. It is also one of only two intact 17th-century brick buildings that survive in the city, the other being Alderman Fenwick's House.
In the 13th century, Newcastle upon Tyne had a population of around 4,000; and it was difficult for the four parish churches to care for the needs of such a large population. The priests were expected to be educators, doctors and counsellors, as well as meeting the spiritual needs of their parishioners. Therefore, in 1291 land was donated by William Baron of Wark on Tweed to found an Augustinian friary on the land on which the museum now stands.
Make Holy Jesus Hospital a centerpiece of your Newcastle upon Tyne vacation itinerary, and find what else is worth visiting using our Newcastle upon Tyne journey planner .
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Holy Jesus Hospital Reviews
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TripAdvisor Traveler Rating 3.5
12 reviews
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4.3
TripAdvisor
  • We stumbled across this very fine building by accident on our way to the quayside. It was not open which is a pity but was very interesting and unexpected placed next to the road underpass and surroun...  more »
  • Fascinating little row of arches that lead you from the ‘toon’ down towards the Quayside. On this visit, the notice on the door offered a once a year opportunity to go inside the Holy Jesus Hospital. ...  more »
Google
  • From the outside, Holy Jesus Hospital looks quite interesting with it's little arches and striking yellow. I can imagine that it would be even more so once inside with the amount of history associated with it. Sadly, the hospital doesn't appear to be open to the public, so it's only possible to admire it from the outside. Such a shame, could've Been Interesting
  • I would pass this building on my work everyday and I had no idea what it was. My only real thought was that I would hate to work there. It is surrounded by tall buildings which would make it dark inside. You couldn't open any windows due to the road noise and stink of fumes from the flyover right outside the building. Not a nice place to work I thought😕. When I first visited this attraction it was only open two days per week (but that's another story ). What I can say is that it was well worth the walk to get to it. The staff (volunteers ☺) were very helpful and knowledgeable. The building is Tudor and only one of the two all brick Tudor buldingd still standing in the city. It was built as an almshouse, not for the poor, but for the great and the good who had fallen on hard times. Where the over size bird bath stands was the once large garden area. The Victorians sliced right through it in order to build a new road and then the ring road was built in its present form. The building has been used as a soup kitchen and then the chemical industry moved in. The interior is excellent with a lot of attention to detail to make it as original as possible. The last time I attempted to visit the museum it was closed to the public. I was informed that it was now being used by the National Tust for a youth training programme but it would open again to the public on special days. ( Feast of the Jedi perchance 😆) Two of my friends who are National Tust Volunteers tell me this excellent attraction is now open once a month, check out their website for full details. Parking is spartan to say the least and on foot the under passes are dirty and not well kept. (Can't blame the Torys as they were in a similar state when I first visited during the Labour rule) Its still worth the effort all the same.
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