9 days in Kanto & Shizuoka Prefecture Itinerary

9 days in Kanto & Shizuoka Prefecture Itinerary

Created using Inspirock Japan tour planner

Make it your trip
Fly
1
Tokyo
— 3 nights
Drive
2
Mito
— 1 night
Drive
3
Saitama
— 1 night
Train
4
Shizuoka
— 1 night
Drive
5
Yokohama
— 2 nights
Fly

S M T W T F S
10
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30

Tokyo

— 3 nights
Tokyo holds the status of most populous metropolitan area in the world--a fact you'll find tangible as you walk the bustling streets and explore its diverse neighborhoods and cultures.
Step out of Tokyo with an excursion to Tokyo DisneySea in Maihama--about 40 minutes away. There's much more to do: make a trip to Meiji Jingu Shrine, contemplate in the serene atmosphere at Senso-ji Temple, take an in-depth tour of Tokyo National Museum, and take in nature's colorful creations at Shinjuku Gyoen National Garden.

To find traveler tips, where to stay, other places to visit, and more tourist information, read Tokyo route maker.

Manila, Philippines to Tokyo is an approximately 7.5-hour flight. Traveling from Manila to Tokyo, you'll lose 1 hour due to the time zone difference. Traveling from Manila in January, expect Tokyo to be much colder, temps between 11°C and 1°C. Cap off your sightseeing on the 19th (Tue) early enough to go by car to Mito.

Things to do in Tokyo

Neighborhoods · Parks · Museums · Historic Sites

Side Trip

Mito

— 1 night
Quaint and historic, Mito serves as the capital of Ibaraki Prefecture, once a castle town and stronghold for the Edo-period Mito clan.
Start off your visit on the 20th (Wed): appreciate the extensive heritage of Semba Boadwalk, take in the spiritual surroundings of Mito Hachimangu Shrine, then walk around Kodokan Park, then enjoy some diversion at Hitachi Seaside Park, and finally don't miss a visit to Mori no Chevre Plaza.

For ratings, more things to do, traveler tips, and other tourist information, use the Mito trip tool.

Traveling by car from Tokyo to Mito takes 2 hours. Alternatively, you can take a train; or take a bus. Expect a bit cooler evenings in Mito when traveling from Tokyo in January, with lows around -3°C. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 20th (Wed) to allow time to drive to Saitama.

Things to do in Mito

Historic Sites · Parks · Fun & Games

Side Trip

Saitama

— 1 night
Though a fairly large city in its own right, Saitama has become known primarily for its proximity to the capital, Tokyo.
Start off your visit on the 21st (Thu): don't miss a visit to Hikawa no Mori Culture Hall, contemplate in the serene atmosphere at Musashi Ichinomiya Hikawa Shrine, then get to know the resident critters at Omiya Park Zoo, then examine the collection at Japan Mint Saitama Museum, and finally contemplate in the serene atmosphere at Musashidai Rokuten Shrine.

You can plan Saitama trip in no time by asking Inspirock to help create your itinerary.

Getting from Mito to Saitama by car takes about 1.5 hours. Other options: take a train; or do a combination of bus and train. Traveling from Mito in January, plan for somewhat warmer nights in Saitama, with lows around 1°C. Finish your sightseeing early on the 21st (Thu) so you can take a train to Shizuoka.

Things to do in Saitama

Historic Sites · Parks · Museums · Zoos & Aquariums

Shizuoka

— 1 night
With its upmarket shopping districts and scenic coastal landscape, Shizuoka stands as the main urban area of a province often referred to as Japan's riviera.
Start off your visit on the 22nd (Fri): contemplate the long history of Satta-toge Pass, meet the residents at Nihondaira Zoo, then contemplate in the serene atmosphere at Kunozan Toshogu Shrine, and finally contemplate in the serene atmosphere at Shizuoka Sengen Shrine.

To find maps, where to stay, other places to visit, and more tourist information, go to the Shizuoka vacation planner.

Take a train from Saitama to Shizuoka in 2.5 hours. Alternatively, you can drive; or do a combination of train and bus. Traveling from Saitama in January, expect somewhat warmer with lows of 5°C in Shizuoka. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 22nd (Fri) early enough to drive to Yokohama.

Things to do in Shizuoka

Historic Sites · Parks · Zoos & Aquariums

Yokohama

— 2 nights
Once a small fishing town, Yokohama was one of the first ports to welcome foreign trade in the 19th century, after which it grew into Japan's second largest city and a bustling metropolis.
Kick off your visit on the 23rd (Sat): step off the mainland to explore Enoshima Island, contemplate in the serene atmosphere at Kōtoku-in, then contemplate the long history of Hase-dera Temple, and finally contemplate in the serene atmosphere at Tsurugaoka Hachimangu Shrine. On the 24th (Sun), you'll have a packed day of sightseeing: contemplate the long history of Kawasaki Daishi, then take a stroll through Yokohama Minato Mirai 21, then stroll around Yamashita Park, and finally visit Yokohama Chinatown.

For reviews, ratings, where to stay, and tourist information, refer to the Yokohama trip planner.

Traveling by car from Shizuoka to Yokohama takes 2 hours. Alternatively, you can take a train; or do a combination of train and subway. January in Yokohama sees daily highs of 11°C and lows of 3°C at night. Finish your sightseeing early on the 24th (Sun) so you can fly back home.

Things to do in Yokohama

Historic Sites · Parks · Neighborhoods · Shopping

Side Trips

Kanto travel guide

4.3
Sacred & Religious Sites · Landmarks · Parks
Nearly synonymous with Tokyo and its suburban sprawl, the region of Kanto encompasses many historical sites, hot springs, semitropical islands, and picturesque mountains. Predictably, most tours of Kanto begin and end in Tokyo, which serves as an ideal base for day trips to nearby national parks, ancient temples, and grand monuments reminding visitors of Japan's shogun era. During feudal times, Kanto reigned as the center of political and military power; today, the area represents one of the country's tourism hubs. As you plan your Kanto itinerary, be sure to include a stop in Kamakura, a small temple town filled with notable cultural treasures.

Ibaraki Prefecture travel guide

4
Sacred & Religious Sites · Playgrounds · Landmarks
Ibaraki Prefecture is a prefecture of Japan, located in the Kantō region on the main island of Honshu. The capital is Mito.HistoryIbaraki Prefecture was previously known as Hitachi Province. In 1871, the name of the province became Ibaraki.

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Saitama Prefecture travel guide

3.8
Sacred & Religious Sites · Parks · Landmarks
Saitama Prefecture is a landlocked prefecture of Japan located in the Kantō region of the island of Honshu. The capital is the city of Saitama.This prefecture is part of the Greater Tokyo Area, and most of Saitama's cities can be described as suburbs of Tokyo, to which a large number of residents commute each day.HistoryAccording to Sendai Kuji Hongi, Chichibu was one of 137 provinces during the reign of Emperor Sujin. Chichibu Province was in western Saitama.Saitama Prefecture was formerly part of the old Musashi Province.In the fifth year of the Keiun era, deposits of copper were reported to have been found in the Chichibu District of what is now Saitama Prefecture.The Saitama area was historically known as a fertile agricultural region which produced much of the food for the Kantō region. During the Edo period, many fudai daimyōs ruled small domains within the Saitama area.After World War II, as Tokyo expanded rapidly and modern transportation allowed longer commutes, the lack of available land in Tokyo led to the rapid development of Saitama Prefecture, where the population has nearly tripled since 1960. Most of the cities in the prefecture are closely connected to downtown Tokyo by metropolitan rail, and operate largely as residential and commercial suburbs of Tokyo.

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Shizuoka Prefecture travel guide

3.7
Sacred & Religious Sites · Landmarks · Parks
Shizuoka Prefecture is a prefecture of Japan located in the Chūbu region of Honshu. The capital is the city of Shizuoka, while Hamamatsu is the largest city by population.HistoryShizuoka Prefecture was formed from the former Tōtōmi, Suruga and Izu provinces.The area was the home of the first Tokugawa Shogun. Tokugawa Ieyasu held the region until he conquered the lands of the Hōjō clan in the Kantō region and placed land under the stewardship of Toyotomi Hideyoshi. After becoming shogun, Tokugawa took the land back for his family and put the area around modern-day Shizuoka city under the direct supervision of the shogunate. With the creation of Shizuoka han in 1868, it once again became the residence of the Tokugawa family.GeographyShizuoka Prefecture is an elongated region following the coast of the Pacific Ocean at the Suruga Bay. In the west, the prefecture extends deep into the Japan Alps. In the east, it becomes a narrower coast bounded in the north by Mount Fuji, until it comes to the Izu Peninsula, a popular resort area pointing south into the Pacific.

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Kanagawa Prefecture travel guide

4.1
Sacred & Religious Sites · Parks · Landmarks
Kanagawa Prefecture is a prefecture located in southern Kantō region of Japan. The capital of the prefecture is Yokohama. Kanagawa is part of the Greater Tokyo Area. Kanagawa Prefecture is home to Kamakura and Hakone, two highly popular side trip destinations from Tokyo.HistoryThe prefecture has some archaeological sites going back to the Jōmon period (around 400 BCE). About 3,000 years ago, Mount Hakone produced a volcanic explosion which resulted in Lake Ashi on the western area of the prefecture.It is believed that the Yamato dynasty ruled this area from the 5th century onwards. In the ancient era, its plains were very sparsely inhabited.In medieval Japan, Kanagawa was part of the provinces of Sagami and Musashi. Kamakura in central Sagami was the capital of Japan during the Kamakura period (1185–1333).During the Edo period, the western part of Sagami Province was governed by the daimyō of Odawara Castle, while the eastern part was directly governed by the Tokugawa shogunate in Edo (Tokyo).

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