8 days in Province of Agrigento Itinerary

8 days in Province of Agrigento Itinerary

Created using Inspirock Province of Agrigento tour itinerary planner

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Make it your trip
Fly to Palermo, Train to Agrigento
1
Agrigento
— 2 nights
Drive
2
Santa Margherita di Belice
— 4 nights
Drive
3
Sambuca di Sicilia
— 1 night
Drive to Falcone–Borsellino Airport, Fly to Zagreb Airport

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Agrigento

— 2 nights

Valley of the Temples

Historically one of ancient Greece's leading cities, Sicily's Agrigento is home to the seven monumental temples that make up the well-preserved Valley of the Temples.
Kick off your visit on the 25th (Sat): explore the striking landscape at Scala dei Turchi and then explore the ancient world of Valle dei Templi. Get ready for a full day of sightseeing on the next day: get engrossed in the history at Museo Archeologico Regionale di Agrigento and then take in nature's colorful creations at Il Giardino della Kolymbethra.

For reviews, more things to do, maps, and more tourist information, go to the Agrigento online vacation planner.

Zagreb, Croatia to Agrigento is an approximately 10-hour combination of flight and train. You can also do a combination of car and ferry; or do a combination of train and bus. Traveling from Zagreb in September, expect Agrigento to be a bit warmer, temps between 31°C and 25°C. On the 26th (Sun), wrap the sightseeing up by early afternoon so you can travel to Santa Margherita di Belice.

Things to do in Agrigento

Parks · Historic Sites · Nature · Museums

Side Trip

Santa Margherita di Belice

— 4 nights
Santa Margherita di Belice is a town in the Province of Agrigento in the Italian region of Sicily. You'll find plenty of places to visit near Santa Margherita di Belice: Spiaggia di Macari (in Macari), Scopello (Baglio Di Scopello & Tonnara di Scopello) and Calatafimi-Segesta (Tempio di Segesta & Teatro Greco di Segesta). Next up on the itinerary: look for gifts at Azienda Agricola Montalbano, tour the pleasant surroundings at Porto Palo di Menfi, mingle with the ghosts of the past at Poggioreale, and make a trip to Palazzo Planeta.

You can plan Santa Margherita di Belice trip in no time by asking Inspirock to help create your itinerary.

Getting from Agrigento to Santa Margherita di Belice by car takes about 1.5 hours. Finish your sightseeing early on the 30th (Thu) to allow enough time to travel to Sambuca di Sicilia.

Things to do in Santa Margherita di Belice

Historic Sites · Beaches · Parks · Outdoors

Side Trips

Sambuca di Sicilia

— 1 night
Sambuca di Sicilia is a comune in the Province of Agrigento in the Italian region Sicily, located about 68km southwest of Palermo and about 89km northwest of Agrigento.Sambuca di Sicilia borders the following municipalities: Bisacquino, Caltabellotta, Contessa Entellina, Giuliana, Menfi, Santa Margherita di Belice, Sciacca. Kick off your visit on the 1st (Fri): see the interesting displays at Museo Archeologico Palazzo Panitteri and then learn about winemaking at Di Giovanna.

To find where to stay, maps, ratings, and other tourist information, use the Sambuca di Sicilia trip itinerary builder app.

Sambuca di Sicilia is just a stone's throw from Santa Margherita di Belice. Wrap up your sightseeing by early afternoon on the 1st (Fri) to allow enough time to travel back home.

Things to do in Sambuca di Sicilia

Wineries · Museums

Province of Agrigento travel guide

3.8
Ruins · Geologic Formations · Landmarks
Agrigento is a city on the southern coast of Sicily, Italy, and capital of the province of Agrigento. It is renowned as the site of the ancient Greek city of Akragas, one of the leading cities of Magna Graecia during the golden age of Ancient Greece with population estimates in the range of 200,000 to 800,000 before 406 BC.HistoryAgrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582-580 BC and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it Akragas.Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia. It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus. At this point the city could have been as large as 100,000 to 200,000 people. Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BC. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century.

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