8 days in Dalmatia Itinerary

8 days in Dalmatia Itinerary

Created using Inspirock Dalmatia trip planner

Make it your trip
Drive
1
Primosten
Drive
2
Trogir
— 1 night
Drive
3
Split
— 2 nights
Drive
4
Makarska
— 1 night
Drive
5
Dubrovnik
— 2 nights
Drive
6
Cavtat
— 1 night
Fly

S M T W T F S
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

Primosten

Primošten is a town in Croatia, and a part of the Šibenik-Knin County. On the 17th (Mon), stroll through Velika Raduca Beach, then pause for some serene contemplation at Hilltop 15th Century Church of St. George in Old Town Primosten, and then look for gifts at Art Shop Unique.

For other places to visit, photos, maps, and more tourist information, read Primosten trip planning website.

Zagreb to Primosten is an approximately 4-hour car ride. Prepare for somewhat warmer weather when traveling from Zagreb in August: high temperatures in Primosten hover around 36°C and lows are around 26°C. Finish your sightseeing early on the 17th (Mon) to allow enough time to drive to Trogir.

Things to do in Primosten

Beaches · Parks · Outdoors · Historic Sites

Trogir

— 1 night

Stone Beauty

A small Dalmatian town dating back to the Hellenistic period, Trogir represents a melting pot of Greek, Roman, and Venetian influences.
Start off your visit on the 18th (Tue): steep yourself in history at Historic City of Trogir and then get some thrills on the water with a speed boat tour.

To find traveler tips, photos, where to stay, and tourist information, refer to the Trogir attractions planner.

You can drive from Primosten to Trogir in an hour. In August in Trogir, expect temperatures between 36°C during the day and 26°C at night. Finish your sightseeing early on the 18th (Tue) so you can drive to Split.

Things to do in Trogir

Outdoors · Transportation · Tours · Historic Sites

Split

— 2 nights

Sportiest City in the World

Experience an authentic Adriatic lifestyle in Split, the largest city along the sea's coast.
Start off your visit on the 19th (Wed): explore the world behind art at Galerija Mestrovic, look for all kinds of wild species at Marjan Park, then contemplate the long history of Old Split, and finally take in the spiritual surroundings of Cathedral of Saint Domnius. Get ready for a full day of sightseeing on the 20th (Thu): steep yourself in history at Kliška tvrđava and then appreciate the extensive heritage of Diocletian's Palace.

For maps, reviews, other places to visit, and tourist information, refer to the Split day trip planning app.

Traveling by car from Trogir to Split takes an hour. Alternatively, you can ride a ferry. In August, plan for daily highs up to 36°C, and evening lows to 24°C. Finish your sightseeing early on the 20th (Thu) so you can drive to Makarska.

Things to do in Split

Historic Sites · Parks · Wildlife · Museums

Makarska

— 1 night
Makarska is a small city on the Adriatic coastline of Croatia, about 60km southeast of Split and 140km northwest of Dubrovnik. On the 21st (Fri), take your sightseeing to a higher altitude at Biokovo and then kick back and relax at Punta Rata Beach.

To see ratings, other places to visit, traveler tips, and tourist information, read our Makarska travel planner.

Traveling by car from Split to Makarska takes 1.5 hours. Alternatively, you can take a bus. In August in Makarska, expect temperatures between 36°C during the day and 26°C at night. Cap off your sightseeing on the 21st (Fri) early enough to go by car to Dubrovnik.

Things to do in Makarska

Parks · Beaches · Outdoors · Nature

Side Trip

Highlights from your trip

Dubrovnik

— 2 nights

Pearl of the Adriatic

Along the Dalmation Coast, the city of Dubrovnik has become famous for its pedestrian-only Old Town surrounded by fortress walls, and its historical heft has earned it World Heritage Site status.
Start off your visit on the 22nd (Sat): take an in-depth tour of War Photo Limited, head off the coast to Lokrum Island, and then kick back and relax at Sveti Jakov Beach. Get ready for a full day of sightseeing on the 23rd (Sun): take in panoramic vistas at Upper Corner Tower Foundry Museum, then appreciate the extensive heritage of Dubrovnik City Walls, then paddle through the water with a kayaking and canoeing tour, and finally contemplate the long history of The Franciscan Church and Monastery.

To find reviews, where to stay, more things to do, and more tourist information, you can read our Dubrovnik trip builder site.

Traveling by car from Makarska to Dubrovnik takes 3 hours. Alternatively, you can take a bus. In August in Dubrovnik, expect temperatures between 34°C during the day and 24°C at night. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 23rd (Sun) so you can go by car to Cavtat.

Things to do in Dubrovnik

Outdoors · Parks · Tours · Adventure

Cavtat

— 1 night
Easy to reach from Dubrovnik, the tiny coastal town of Cavtat is known for its Mediterranean vegetation, unspoiled waters, and diverse architecture.
On the 24th (Mon), make a trip to Cavtat Cemetery, then stop by Cavtat Old Town, then pause for some serene contemplation at Church of Our Lady of the Snow, and finally take in the waterfront at Cavtat Seaside Promenade.

Take the guesswork out of planning a Cavtat vacation by using our trip itinerary maker.

Cavtat is very close to Dubrovnik. In August, daytime highs in Cavtat are 35°C, while nighttime lows are 24°C. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 24th (Mon) so you can travel back home.

Things to do in Cavtat

Historic Sites · Neighborhoods

Dalmatia travel guide

4.4
Historic Walking Areas · Landmarks · Historic Sites
Known for its warm sea, wooded islands, preserved medieval cities, and beaches of white sand and soft pebble, Dalmatia remains separated from the inland area by a barren mountain range, the Dinaric Alps. Secluded coves, caves, coral reefs, shipwrecks, and Robinson Crusoe-style islets beckon visitors, who often come to explore by diving or yachting. Known for cuisine including seafood, Croatian wines, and olive oils, the region maintains a cozy atmosphere thanks to small, family-run restaurants. Fortified coastal towns here bear traces of the land's many conquerors, including Illyrians, Greeks, Romans, Byzantines, Venetians, and Austro-Hungarians. Medieval piazzas and streets lined with Gothic, Renaissance, and Baroque palaces welcome visitors with art festivals, food, and music.