5 days in Dumfries and Galloway Itinerary

5 days in Dumfries and Galloway Itinerary

Created using Inspirock Dumfries and Galloway journey planner

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Drive
1
Dumfries
— 3 nights
Drive
2
Mull of Galloway
— 1 night
Drive

S M T W T F S
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Dumfries

— 3 nights
Dumfries is a market town and former royal burgh within the Dumfries and Galloway council area of Scotland.
Venture out of the city with trips to Threave Garden (in Castle Douglas), Gretna Green Famous Blacksmiths Shop (in Gretna Green) and Gretna Gateway Outlet Village (in Gretna). And it doesn't end there: explore the historical opulence of Caerlaverock Castle, brush up on your knowledge of spirits at Annandale Distillery, see the interesting displays at The Devil's Porridge Museum, and experience rural life at Mabie Farm Park.

To see other places to visit, where to stay, maps, and more tourist information, go to the Dumfries trip builder app.

Manchester to Dumfries is an approximately 3-hour car ride. You can also take a train; or do a combination of train and bus. Expect a daytime high around 22°C in July, and nighttime lows around 17°C. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 14th (Wed) early enough to drive to Mull of Galloway.

Things to do in Dumfries

Museums · Historic Sites · Breweries & Distilleries · Shopping

Side Trips

Mull of Galloway

— 1 night
Kick off your visit on the 15th (Thu): visit a coastal fixture at Mull of Galloway Lighthouse and then take in nature's colorful creations at Logan Botanic Garden.

To see reviews, ratings, more things to do, and more tourist information, use the Mull of Galloway trip planner.

You can drive from Dumfries to Mull of Galloway in 2 hours. Finish your sightseeing early on the 15th (Thu) so you can travel back home.

Things to do in Mull of Galloway

Historic Sites · Parks

Dumfries and Galloway travel guide

4.4
Gardens · Castles · History Museums
The mild climate and gentle landscapes of Dumfries and Galloway unavoidably influence the region’s culture, history, and everyday life. The region includes three National Scenic Areas, with numerous short- and long-distance walking paths and mountain bike trails. The rolling hills and lush valleys of this area hide some of the country’s most idyllic towns. This is one of Scotland’s sunniest regions, boasting some of the finest gardens in the entire country. Long accustomed to welcoming tourists from around the globe, even the smallest of the region’s attractions often include a convenient visitor center and a small local museum.