5 days in Brittany Itinerary

5 days in Brittany Itinerary

Created using Inspirock Brittany sightseeing planner

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Make it your trip
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Saint-Malo
— 4 nights
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Saint-Malo

— 4 nights
Once the feared base of pirates and heavily fortified against Norman attacks, today's coastal Saint-Malo is one of the top tourist draws.
Get out of town with these interesting Saint-Malo side-trips: Mont Saint-Michel (in Mont-Saint-Michel), Mausolee du Mont d'Huisnes (in Huisnes sur Mer) and Le Vieux Pont de Ducey (in Ducey). There's still lots to do: make a trip to Les Remparts de Saint-Malo, trek along GR 34, step off the mainland to explore Le Grand Be, and take a memorable tour with Sensations Littoral.

To see maps and more tourist information, read our Saint-Malo online trip builder.

Brussels, Belgium to Saint-Malo is an approximately 6.5-hour train ride. You can also drive; or do a combination of flight and car. Expect a daytime high around 24°C in September, and nighttime lows around 13°C. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 24th (Thu) so you can catch the train back home.

Things to do in Saint-Malo

Historic Sites · Parks · Outdoors · Zoos & Aquariums

Side Trips

Brittany travel guide

4.5
Landmarks · Historic Walking Areas · Specialty Museums
Known for its large number of megaliths, which simply means "big rocks," Brittany is famous for its 2,860 km (1,780 mi) of coastline and for its prehistoric menhirs (standing stones) and dolmens (stone tables)--sites that were used for burials and worship. You can see a large variety of seabirds while sightseeing along the ocean, as the region is home to colonies of cormorants, gulls, razorbills, northern gannets, common murres, and Atlantic puffins. The waters of Brittany attract marine animals, including basking sharks, grey seals, leatherback turtles, dolphins, porpoises, jellyfish, crabs, and lobsters. Brittany is widely known for the Breton horse, a local breed of draft horse, and for the Brittany gun dog. The region also has its own breeds of cattle that you can witness at area farms and open-air museums, some of which are on the brink of extinction: the Bretonne pie noir, the Froment du Léon, the Armoricann, and the Nantaise. The region has plenty of places to visit, namely a huge quantity of medieval buildings, including numerous Romanesque and Gothic churches, castles, and the iconic half-timbered houses visible in many villages, towns, and cities.