4 days in County Kerry Itinerary

4 days in County Kerry Itinerary

Created using Inspirock County Kerry route planner

Make it your trip
Fly
1
Dingle
— 2 nights
Drive
2
Killarney
— 1 night
Fly

S M T W T F S
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
1
2
3
4
5
6
7

Dingle

— 2 nights
Located on Ireland's western coastline, Dingle sits between scenic mountains and the Atlantic Ocean.
Relax by the water at Inch Beach and Coumeenoole Beach. Attractions like Dolphin & Whale Watching and Slea Head Drive make great kid-friendly stops. Next up on the itinerary: cruise along Dingle Peninsula, meet the residents at Dingle Oceanworld, and step off the mainland to explore Great Blasket Island.

Discover how to plan a Dingle trip in just a few steps with Inspirock's itinerary builder.

Dublin to Dingle is an approximately 3-hour flight. You can also drive; or take a bus. In July, daytime highs in Dingle are 21°C, while nighttime lows are 15°C. Finish your sightseeing early on the 1st (Sun) so you can drive to Killarney.

Things to do in Dingle

Outdoors · Scenic Drive · Parks · Beaches

Side Trips

Killarney

— 1 night
Continuously inhabited since the Neolithic period, Killarney draws visitors with its picturesque natural scenery, fine restaurants, and traditional pubs.
Start off your visit on the 2nd (Mon): take in the dramatic scenery at Torc Waterfall and then appreciate the views at Gap of Dunloe.

For other places to visit, maps, reviews, and more tourist information, read Killarney online sightseeing planner.

Drive from Dingle to Killarney in 1.5 hours. Alternatively, you can take a bus; or do a combination of bus and train. In August, daytime highs in Killarney are 20°C, while nighttime lows are 14°C. Finish your sightseeing early on the 2nd (Mon) so you can fly back home.

Things to do in Killarney

Nature · Parks

County Kerry travel guide

4.5
National Parks · Gardens · Scenic Drive
The Kingdom
Forming Ireland's southwestern corner, County Kerry encompasses world-renowned landmarks like the Ring of Kerry and Dingle Peninsula and features the major city of Killarney at its heart. As a peripheral part of the country, County Kerry supports a thriving traditional Irish culture, including the Irish language, music, and dance. Nearly 5,000 native Irish speakers reside in the area, concentrated in two large Gaeltachts known as Corca Dhuibhne and Uibh Rathach. Many visitors come to enjoy the rugged beauty of Kerry's coastline, lakes, and mountains. Several picturesque walking routes wind their way through the landscape, giving tourists the chance to engage deeply with its untamed nature.