36 days in Province of Valladolid Itinerary

36 days in Province of Valladolid Itinerary

Created using Inspirock Province of Valladolid route planner

©
Make it your trip
Fly to Madrid, Train to Valladolid
1
Valladolid
— 35 nights
Train to Madrid, Fly to Malaga

S M T W T F S
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28

Valladolid

— 35 nights

Land of Castles

A city of booming industry with a strong emphasis on leisure and cultural involvement, Valladolid is also known for its historical heritage and medieval feel.
Get out of town with these interesting Valladolid side-trips: Tordesillas (Museo del Tratado de Tordesillas, Real Monasterio de Santa Clara, &more), Rueda (Bodegas Mocen, Bodegas Grupo Yllera, &more) and Finca Villacreces (in Quintanilla de Onesimo). The adventure continues: see the interesting displays at Museo Nacional de Escultura, don't miss a visit to Centro de Iniciativas Turisticas, take in the spiritual surroundings of Iglesia de San Pablo, and brush up on your military savvy at Academia de Caballeria.

For other places to visit, reviews, traveler tips, and tourist information, read Valladolid trip tool.

Malaga to Valladolid is an approximately 4.5-hour combination of flight and train. You can also take a train; or drive. Traveling from Malaga in July, plan for little chillier nights in Valladolid, with lows around 15°C. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 25th (Wed) early enough to travel back home.

Things to do in Valladolid

Historic Sites · Wineries · Museums · Parks

Side Trips

Province of Valladolid travel guide

4.2
Wineries & Vineyards · Specialty Museums · Castles
Once the capital of the Castilian Empire, the Province of Valladolid is known as the “Land of Castles,” with over 30 fortifications still remaining throughout its prairie-like landscape. The capital city, Valladolid, serves as the region’s cultural and economic center, with a cosmopolitan, new-world vibe amid impressive Renaissance architecture. Because of its significant agricultural contribution, the province has become famous for its gastronomy and production of some of the most well-known wines in the country, in turn facilitating a strong culture of tapas and wine tasting.