3 days in Argyll and Bute Itinerary

3 days in Argyll and Bute Itinerary

Created using Inspirock Argyll and Bute route planner

©
Plan created by another user. Make it yours
Fly to Glasgow International Airport, Drive to Helensburgh
1
Helensburgh
— Few hours
Drive
2
Benmore
— 1 night
Drive to Glasgow International Airport, Fly to Los Angeles International Airport

S M T W T F S
12
13
14
15
16
17
18

few
hours
Helensburgh

Helensburgh is a town within the Helensburgh and Lomond Area of Argyll and Bute Council, Scotland. Start off your visit on the 14th (Tue): look for gifts at Posh Paws Teddy Bears.

For more things to do, ratings, reviews, and more tourist information, read Helensburgh trip builder.

Los Angeles, USA to Helensburgh is an approximately 20-hour combination of flight and car. Traveling from Los Angeles to Helensburgh, you'll lose 8 hours due to the time zone difference. Traveling from Los Angeles in April, expect nights in Helensburgh to be little chillier, around 37°F, while days are cooler, around 53°F. Finish your sightseeing early on the 14th (Tue) to allow enough time to travel to Benmore.

Things to do in Helensburgh

Shopping

1
night
Benmore

Kick off your visit on the 15th (Wed): explore the activities along Loch Eck.

Take the guesswork out of planning a Benmore vacation by using our trip itinerary maker.

You can drive from Helensburgh to Benmore in 1.5 hours. April in Benmore sees daily highs of 53°F and lows of 37°F at night. On the 15th (Wed), you'll have the morning to explore before heading back home.

Things to do in Benmore

Parks · Nature · Wildlife

Side Trip

Highlights from your trip

Argyll and Bute travel guide

4.3
Castles · Distilleries · Landmarks
The wild and rugged coastline of Argyll and Bute has provided many works of fiction, including the novels of Robert Louis Stevenson, with some very dramatic settings. With a history of ancient clan rivalries, this region still maintains its fierce spirit of independence and a deep respect for the old Gaelic culture. Nowhere is this more evident than in the region’s road signs, which are written in both Gaelic and English, with Gaelic place names often listed first. Though the region is separated from the mainland only by a narrow strait, much of it seems a world away from the rest of the country.