19 days in United Kingdom Itinerary

19 days in United Kingdom Itinerary

Created using Inspirock United Kingdom itinerary planner

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Make it your trip
Fly
1
London
— 3 nights
+2
Drive to London Heathrow Airport, Fly to Liverpool John Lennon Airport, Drive to Holmrook
2
Holmrook
— 3 nights
Drive
3
Glasgow
— 5 nights
Drive
4
Edinburgh
— 5 nights
Fly

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London

— 3 nights

The Square Mile

Vibrant and noisy, London is one of the world’s leading cities, an international capital of culture, education, fashion, music, finance, trade, and politics.
London is known for museums, nightlife, and historic sites. Your plan includes some of its best attractions: take in panoramic vistas at Coca-Cola London Eye, steep yourself in history at Tower of London, admire the masterpieces at National Gallery, and get a new perspective on nature at Natural History Museum.

To see where to stay, ratings, reviews, and other tourist information, read our London day trip tool.

Grande Prairie, Canada to London is an approximately 18.5-hour flight. You'll lose 7 hours traveling from Grande Prairie to London due to the time zone difference. Prepare for much hotter weather when traveling from Grande Prairie in November: high temperatures in London hover around 13°C and lows are around 5°C. Cap off your sightseeing on the 30th (Sat) early enough to travel to Holmrook.

Things to do in London

Museums · Historic Sites · Parks

Holmrook

— 3 nights
Holmrook is a linear village in the English county of Cumbria. Explore the numerous day-trip ideas around Holmrook: J.B.Banks and Son Ltd (in Cockermouth), Lakeland Motor Museum (in Backbarrow) and St Catherine's Chruch (in Boot). And it doesn't end there: indulge your thirst for a good beer at Keswick Brewing Company, tour the pleasant surroundings at Catbells Lakeland Walk, hike along Helvellyn, and explore the ancient world of Castlerigg Stone Circle.

To find photos, traveler tips, maps, and tourist information, refer to the Holmrook day trip planner.

Use the Route module to find suitable travel options from London to Holmrook. Finish your sightseeing early on the 4th (Wed) to allow enough time to travel to Glasgow.

Things to do in Holmrook

Parks · Trails · Outdoors · Nature

Side Trips

Glasgow

— 5 nights

Scotland's Style Capital

Scotland’s largest city, Glasgow is known for its cultural heritage and the friendliness of its people.
Explore Glasgow's surroundings by going to Stirling Castle (in Stirling) and Falkirk Wheel (in Falkirk). And it doesn't end there: bet on your favorite at Glasgow Tigers Speedway, take in the spiritual surroundings of Glasgow Cathedral, have some family-friendly fun at Snow Factor, and stroll around Pollok Country Park.

To find reviews, maps, ratings, and tourist information, read Glasgow sightseeing planner.

Drive from Holmrook to Glasgow in 3 hours. December in Glasgow sees daily highs of 9°C and lows of 3°C at night. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 9th (Mon) early enough to drive to Edinburgh.

Things to do in Glasgow

Museums · Parks · Fun & Games · Historic Sites

Side Trips

Edinburgh

— 5 nights

Athens of the North

World Heritage-listed Edinburgh combines ancient and modern in a uniquely Scottish atmosphere.
Edinburgh is known for historic sites, museums, and nightlife. Your plan includes some of its best attractions: explore the historical opulence of Edinburgh Castle, make a trip to The Royal Mile, contemplate the long history of The Real Mary King's Close, and take in the local highlights with Walking tours.

To see more things to do, ratings, maps, and tourist information, read Edinburgh day trip planning website.

You can drive from Glasgow to Edinburgh in 1.5 hours. Alternatively, you can take a train; or take a bus. December in Edinburgh sees daily highs of 9°C and lows of 2°C at night. You'll have a few hours on the 14th (Sat) to wrap things up before traveling home.

Things to do in Edinburgh

Museums · Historic Sites · Parks · Tours

United Kingdom travel guide

4.3
Specialty Museums · Nightlife · Castles
Home to an impressive 25 World Heritage sites, the United Kingdom, which includes England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland, has hundreds of museums to explore, thousands of parks and gardens to stroll through, and tens of thousands of communities to discover. From Land’s End in the south to John O’Groats in the north, the country is packed with tourist attractions that can fill a range of itineraries. With nearly 30 million tourists visiting every year, the UK is ranked among the top ten holiday destinations in the world. Known for its royalty, this country also represents a diverse patchwork of native and immigrant cultures. Although Britannia no longer rules the waves, it possesses a captivating history and a dynamic modern culture, both of which remain hugely influential on the rest of the world.

Seascale travel guide

4.7
World heritage site · Beaches · Hiking Trails
Seascale is a village and civil parish on the Irish Sea coast of Cumbria in north-west England.HistoryThe place-name indicates that it was inhabited by Norse settlers, probably before 1000 AD. It is derived from skali, meaning in Norse a wooden hut or shelter. This could well date from the time of King Harold Fairhair, who vowed revenge on the many Norsemen who had settled in Ireland and the Isle of Man, causing them to flee across the sea to the Cumbrian coast some time after AD 885. Many other Norse place names are to be found, including Seascale How, Skala Haugr, (the hill near the shelter), and Whitriggs, hvitihrgger (the white ridge). As the Norse penetrated inland other skalar were named, so Seascale was distinguished by reference to the sea.The earliest written reference to Seascale is in the period 1154–1181, when an Aldwin de Seascale was witness to a deed made at Wetheral priory. Another early reference is in 1200 in a charter of Roger de Beauchamp to the priory of St. Bees. It states that land he gave to that monastery was near Leseschalis or Seascale, on the western coast. About this time Alan de Coupland and William de Wabyrththwaite granted land to Walter de Sewnyhous in the nearby manor of Bolton, which remained in that family's possession for over 500 years. The present community of Hallsenna is derived from this name, being called Hall Sevenhouse, and later, Hall Senhouse. Seascale was part of the ancient parish of Gosforth, which was divided into the manors of Gosforth, Boonwood, Bolton High, Bolton Low and Seascale, who jointly elected a churchwarden for Gosforth church.

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