15 days in Sicily Itinerary

15 days in Sicily Itinerary

Created using Inspirock Sicily vacation planner

Make it your trip
Fly
1
Catania
— 3 nights
Drive
2
Taormina
— 2 nights
Drive
3
Noto
— 1 night
Drive
4
Ragusa
— 2 nights
Drive
5
Agrigento
— 2 nights
Drive
6
Palermo
— 4 nights
Fly

S M T W T F S
5
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25

Catania

— 3 nights

Black Pearl of Ionian Sea

The landscape surrounding Catania, a medieval city on Sicily's eastern coast, is dominated by Mount Etna, the tallest active volcano in Europe.
Your day by day itinerary now includes Ear of Dionysius (Orecchio di Dionisio). Explore the numerous day-trip ideas around Catania: Etna Donkey Trekking (in Linguaglossa), Etna Passion (in Zafferana Etnea) and Syracuse (Ortigia, Teatro Greco, &more). There's more to do: contemplate the long history of Piazza Duomo.

For traveler tips, where to stay, maps, and other tourist information, use the Catania trip itinerary planning website.

New York City, USA to Catania is an approximately 15-hour flight. You'll lose 6 hours traveling from New York City to Catania due to the time zone difference. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 14th (Tue) so you can go by car to Taormina.

Things to do in Catania

Parks · Outdoors · Nature · Historic Sites

Side Trips

Taormina

— 2 nights
With its warm island weather and cliffside location overlooking the Ionion Sea, Taormina has been one of Sicily's most popular getaway destinations since the early 19th century.
Start off your visit on the 15th (Wed): go for a walk through Piazza IX Aprile, make a trip to Corso Umberto, walk around Villa Comunale, then make a trip to Ancient Theatre of Taormina, then head off the coast to Isola Bella, and finally take in the spiritual surroundings of Chiesa del Varo. On the next day, squeeze the most out of the city with Etna Wild, then learn about winemaking at Gambino Vini, and then discover the deep blue sea with Blue Sea Diving Center.

For more things to do, other places to visit, ratings, and tourist information, read Taormina road trip planning website.

Traveling by car from Catania to Taormina takes an hour. Alternatively, you can take a bus; or take a train. In September, daily temperatures in Taormina can reach 82°F, while at night they dip to 69°F. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 16th (Thu) so you can go by car to Noto.

Things to do in Taormina

Outdoors · Tours · Wildlife · Wineries

Side Trips

Noto

— 1 night
Noto is a city and comune in the Province of Syracuse, Sicily, Italy. On the 17th (Fri), tour the pleasant surroundings at Spiaggia Calamosche, look for all kinds of wild species at Riserva Naturale Orientata Oasi faunistica di Vendicari, then explore the historical opulence of Palazzo Nicolaci, then get to know the fascinating history of Centro Storico, and finally take in the architecture and atmosphere at Chiesa Santa Chiara.

For other places to visit, ratings, more things to do, and other tourist information, read our Noto planner.

You can drive from Taormina to Noto in 2 hours. Other options are to take a train; or take a bus. Cap off your sightseeing on the 17th (Fri) early enough to go by car to Ragusa.

Things to do in Noto

Historic Sites · Parks · Beaches · Outdoors

Ragusa

— 2 nights

Town of Bridges

Once a flourishing ancient city, Ragusa was rebuilt after a devastating earthquake in 1693.
On the 18th (Sat), get a taste of life in the country at Gli Aromi Sicily, then stop by ArtigianArte, then pause for some serene contemplation at Cathedral of St. George, and finally don't miss a visit to Ragusa Ibla. Get ready for a full day of sightseeing on the 19th (Sun): contemplate in the serene atmosphere at Duomo San Giorgio, examine the collection at Museo degli Arnesi di Una Volta, get to know the fascinating history of Centro storico di Scicli - World Heritage Site, then take an in-depth tour of A Rutta ri Ron Carmelu, and finally examine the collection at Mulino ad Acqua - Museo Cavallo d'Ispica.

To find more things to do, photos, where to stay, and other tourist information, read Ragusa trip itinerary planning tool.

Drive from Noto to Ragusa in 1.5 hours. Alternatively, you can take a train; or take a bus. In September in Ragusa, expect temperatures between 82°F during the day and 63°F at night. Finish your sightseeing early on the 19th (Sun) so you can drive to Agrigento.

Things to do in Ragusa

Historic Sites · Museums · Shopping

Side Trips

Agrigento

— 2 nights

Valley of the Temples

Historically one of ancient Greece's leading cities, Sicily's Agrigento is home to the seven monumental temples that make up the well-preserved Valley of the Temples.
Kick off your visit on the 20th (Mon): indulge in some personalized pampering at Seta Spa and Wellness, take an in-depth tour of Museo Archeologico Regionale di Agrigento, and then delve into the distant past at Valle dei Templi. On your second day here, learn about all things military at Museo Etnoantropologico, take in the architecture and atmosphere at Chiesa di Santa Oliva, and then take in the dramatic natural features at Scala dei Turchi.

To find photos, maps, and other tourist information, read Agrigento online road trip planner.

Traveling by car from Ragusa to Agrigento takes 2.5 hours. Alternatively, you can do a combination of train and bus; or take a bus. Traveling from Ragusa in September, expect a bit warmer with lows of 71°F in Agrigento. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 21st (Tue) to allow time to drive to Palermo.

Things to do in Agrigento

Historic Sites · Museums · Parks · Spas

Side Trips

Palermo

— 4 nights
The capital of Sicily, Palermo was founded by the Phoenicians under the name of Ziz.
Get out of town with these interesting Palermo side-trips: Riserva Naturale Dello Zingaro (in Castellammare del Golfo) and Duomo di Monreale (in Monreale). There's much more to do: pause for some serene contemplation at Cattedrale di Palermo, ponder the design of Fontana della Vergogna (Fontana Pretoria), admire the striking features of Norman Palace, and savor the flavors at Food & Drink.

For traveler tips, more things to do, reviews, and other tourist information, refer to the Palermo journey planner.

Traveling by car from Agrigento to Palermo takes 2.5 hours. Alternatively, you can take a bus; or take a train. Finish your sightseeing early on the 25th (Sat) so you can travel back home.

Things to do in Palermo

Historic Sites · Parks · Wildlife · Tours

Side Trips

Sicily travel guide

4.5
Beaches · Ruins · Churches
The largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, Sicily is a ruggedly attractive land. The island has a long history of foreign domination and has been controlled by the Greeks, Romans, Arabs, and Normans. The result is a distinct culture blending elements from all of those areas and featuring an intriguing dialect. This is a huge island with plenty of small villages to tour, each with its own treasures. Beyond the popular coastal areas, Sicily's inland attractions include an unspoiled landscape of mountains, hills, and villages that sometimes seem frozen in time. While the natural environment is its biggest draw, Sicily's greatest asset may be its people. They are proud of their traditions and incredibly hospitable to visitors.

Province of Syracuse travel guide

3.8
Islands · Beaches · Ruins
Syracuse is a historic city in Sicily, the capital of the province of Syracuse. The city is notable for its rich Greek history, culture, amphitheatres, architecture, and as the birthplace of the preeminent mathematician and engineer Archimedes. This 2,700-year-old city played a key role in ancient times, when it was one of the major powers of the Mediterranean world. Syracuse is located in the southeast corner of the island of Sicily, next to the Gulf of Syracuse beside the Ionian Sea.The city was founded by Ancient Greek Corinthians and Teneans and became a very powerful city-state. Syracuse was allied with Sparta and Corinth and exerted influence over the entirety of Magna Graecia, of which it was the most important city. Described by Cicero as "the greatest Greek city and the most beautiful of them all", it equaled Athens in size during the fifth century BC. It later became part of the Roman Republic and Byzantine Empire. After this Palermo overtook it in importance, as the capital of the Kingdom of Sicily. Eventually the kingdom would be united with the Kingdom of Naples to form the Two Sicilies until the Italian unification of 1860.

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Province of Ragusa travel guide

4.2
Historic Walking Areas · Churches · Beaches
Ragusa is a city and comune in southern Italy. It is the capital of the province of Ragusa, on the island of Sicily, with 73,288 inhabitants in 2016. It is built on a wide limestone hill between two deep valleys, Cava San Leonardo and Cava Santa Domenica. Together with seven other cities in the Val di Noto, it is part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site.HistoryThe origins of Ragusa can be traced back to the 2nd millennium BC, when there were several Sicel settlements in the area. The current district of Ragusa Ibla has been identified as Hybla Heraea.The ancient city, located on a, 300m high hill, came into contact with nearby Greek colonies, and grew thanks to the nearby port of Camerina. Following a short period of Carthaginian rule, it fell into the hands of the ancient Romans and the Byzantines, who fortified the city and built a large castle. Ragusa was occupied by the Arabs in 848 AD, remaining under their rule until the 11th century, when the Normans conquered it. Selected as County seat, its first Count was Geoffrey, son of Count Ruggero of Sicily.

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Province of Agrigento travel guide

3.8
Ruins · Geologic Formations · Landmarks
Agrigento is a city on the southern coast of Sicily, Italy, and capital of the province of Agrigento. It is renowned as the site of the ancient Greek city of Akragas, one of the leading cities of Magna Graecia during the golden age of Ancient Greece with population estimates in the range of 200,000 to 800,000 before 406 BC.HistoryAgrigento was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582-580 BC and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it Akragas.Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia. It came to prominence under the 6th-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus. At this point the city could have been as large as 100,000 to 200,000 people. Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BC. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the 4th century.

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