11 days in East Asia Itinerary

11 days in East Asia Itinerary

Created using Inspirock Japan travel route planner

Make it your trip
Fly to Chūbu Centrair, Train to Matsumoto
1
Matsumoto
— 1 day
Train to Kachigawa, Fly to Aomori
2
Aomori
— 1 night
Drive
3
Hirosaki
Drive
4
Morioka
— 1 night
Drive
5
Semboku
— 1 day
Train
6
Sendai
— 1 night
Drive
7
Niigata
— 1 night
Drive
8
Aizuwakamatsu
Drive
9
Mito
— 1 night
Drive
10
Saitama
— 1 night
Drive
11
Tokyo
— 3 nights
Fly

S M T W T F S
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
1
2

Matsumoto

— 1 day
A castle town, Matsumoto possesses one of the best-preserved feudal structures in the country, and maintains its historical attractions and traditions while simultaneously exuding a modern, cosmopolitan charm.
On the 21st (Mon), deepen your understanding at Suzuki Shin-ichi Talent Education Institute, see the interesting displays at Matsumoto City Museum, and then make a trip to Matsumoto Castle.

To find where to stay, more things to do, photos, and more tourist information, use the Matsumoto road trip tool.

Jakarta, Indonesia to Matsumoto is an approximately 13-hour combination of flight and train. The time zone changes from Western Indonesia Time to Japan Standard Time, which is usually a 2 hour difference. Expect cooler temperatures when traveling from Jakarta in December; daily highs in Matsumoto reach 7°C and lows reach 0°C. Finish your sightseeing early on the 21st (Mon) so you can travel to Aomori.

Things to do in Matsumoto

Historic Sites · Museums

Aomori

— 1 night
Facing Mutsu Bay on the northernmost tip of Honshu, Aomori is a bustling regional capital known for its fresh seafood and modern architecture.
Ask Inspirock to suggest an itinerary and make planning a trip to Aomori fast, fun, and easy.

Getting from Matsumoto to Aomori by combination of train and flight takes about 5.5 hours. Other options: take a train; or drive. Traveling from Matsumoto in December, expect nights in Aomori to be about the same, around -2°C, while days are little chillier, around 1°C. On the 22nd (Tue), you're off to Hirosaki.

Things to do in Aomori

Historic Sites · Parks · Museums · Nature

Hirosaki

A center of political power during the feudal era, Hirosaki today stands as a hub of culture and history in the north of the island.
Start off your visit on the 22nd (Tue): stroll around Hirosaki Park, then explore the historical opulence of Hirosaki Castle, and then stop by Omoide Shop Sakura House.

For ratings, traveler tips, maps, and tourist information, refer to the Hirosaki trip itinerary builder website.

Traveling by car from Aomori to Hirosaki takes 1.5 hours. Alternatively, you can take a train. In December, plan for daily highs up to 1°C, and evening lows to -2°C. Cap off your sightseeing on the 22nd (Tue) early enough to go by car to Morioka.

Things to do in Hirosaki

Historic Sites · Parks · Shopping

Morioka

— 1 night
The city of Morioka sits against a mountainous backdrop, framed by two main rivers.
To find other places to visit, more things to do, photos, and other tourist information, read Morioka day trip planning tool.

Traveling by car from Hirosaki to Morioka takes 2.5 hours. Alternatively, you can take a train; or take a bus. In December in Morioka, expect temperatures between 4°C during the day and -1°C at night. You'll set off for Semboku on the 23rd (Wed).

Things to do in Morioka

Historic Sites · Parks · Museums · Nature

Semboku

— 1 day
Established in 2005 by the merging of several towns and villages, Semboku boasts an Old Japan atmosphere, punctuated by traditional onsen resorts, old samurai houses, and weeping cherry trees.
On the 23rd (Wed), sample the tasty concoctions at Ando Jozo Brewery Honten, browse the exhibits of Ishiguro Samurai House, steep yourself in history at Aoyagi Samurai Manor Museum, then stop by Samurai District, and finally take an in-depth tour of Kakunodate Samurai House Museum.

To see other places to visit, more things to do, where to stay, and more tourist information, read Semboku trip itinerary site.

You can drive from Morioka to Semboku in 1.5 hours. Alternatively, you can take a train. In December in Semboku, expect temperatures between 3°C during the day and 0°C at night. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 23rd (Wed) so you can catch the train to Sendai.

Things to do in Semboku

Historic Sites · Museums · Breweries & Distilleries · Neighborhoods

Sendai

— 1 night
Human history and nature combine seamlessly in Sendai, with the influence of each never far away in this green and storied city.
Kick off your visit on the 24th (Thu): get your game on at Icerink Sendai, don't miss a visit to Ruins of the Great East Japan Earthquake Sedai Arahama Elementary School, explore the historical opulence of Sendaijo Ato, appreciate the history behind Zuihoden, then don't miss a visit to Sendai Station, and finally make a trip to Jozenji-dori Avenue.

To find where to stay, other places to visit, photos, and more tourist information, read our Sendai travel itinerary planner.

Traveling by train from Semboku to Sendai takes 2 hours. Alternatively, you can drive. In December, Sendai is a bit warmer than Semboku - with highs of 8°C and lows of 5°C. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 24th (Thu) to allow time to drive to Niigata.

Things to do in Sendai

Fun & Games · Historic Sites · Museums

Niigata

— 1 night
The port city of Niigata has an association with tourism, but not really one to do with the city itself.
To see ratings, where to stay, and more tourist information, go to the Niigata online visit planner.

Getting from Sendai to Niigata by car takes about 3.5 hours. Other options: take a bus; or take a train. In December in Niigata, expect temperatures between 9°C during the day and 3°C at night. On the 25th (Fri), you're off to Aizuwakamatsu.

Things to do in Niigata

Historic Sites · Museums · Parks · Shopping

Aizuwakamatsu

Rich in culture and history, Aizuwakamatsu has retained much of its traditional character from its days as a feudal capital.
Kick off your visit on the 25th (Fri): explore the historical opulence of Tsuruga jo Castle, stop by Aizu Shurakukan, and then take in the exciting artwork at Suzuzen.

Planning Aizuwakamatsu trip won't be overwhelming when you use Inspirock's itinerary maker.

Traveling by car from Niigata to Aizuwakamatsu takes 2 hours. Alternatively, you can take a train. Traveling from Niigata in December, expect a bit cooler with lows of 0°C in Aizuwakamatsu. Cap off your sightseeing on the 25th (Fri) early enough to go by car to Mito.

Things to do in Aizuwakamatsu

Shopping · Classes · Historic Sites · Museums
Highlights from your trip

Mito

— 1 night
Quaint and historic, Mito serves as the capital of Ibaraki Prefecture, once a castle town and stronghold for the Edo-period Mito clan.
Kick off your visit on the 26th (Sat): admire the striking features of Kobuntei, get lost in a book at Sagawa Library, walk around Mito City Forest Park, then make a trip to Mori no Chevre Plaza, and finally admire the natural beauty at Howaen.

To find photos, traveler tips, reviews, and tourist information, refer to the Mito trip itinerary app.

You can drive from Aizuwakamatsu to Mito in 3 hours. Other options are to take a train; or take a bus. Traveling from Aizuwakamatsu in December, expect nights in Mito to be about the same, around 0°C, while days are a bit warmer, around 13°C. Cap off your sightseeing on the 26th (Sat) early enough to go by car to Saitama.

Things to do in Mito

Parks

Saitama

— 1 night
Though a fairly large city in its own right, Saitama has become known primarily for its proximity to the capital, Tokyo.
Start off your visit on the 27th (Sun): contemplate in the serene atmosphere at Musashi Ichinomiya Hikawa Shrine, stroll around Shimin no Mori, then learn about wildlife with up-close encounters at Osaki Park Children's Zoo, then take in the spiritual surroundings of Nanasato Shrine, and finally walk around Oarata Kotsu Park.

For more things to do, other places to visit, and other tourist information, read Saitama travel route builder tool.

Drive from Mito to Saitama in 1.5 hours. Alternatively, you can take a train; or do a combination of bus and train. Expect a bit warmer evenings in Saitama when traveling from Mito in December, with lows around 4°C. Finish your sightseeing early on the 27th (Sun) so you can drive to Tokyo.

Things to do in Saitama

Parks · Historic Sites · Zoos & Aquariums

Side Trips

Highlights from your trip

Tokyo

— 3 nights
Tokyo holds the status of most populous metropolitan area in the world--a fact you'll find tangible as you walk the bustling streets and explore its diverse neighborhoods and cultures.
Change things up with these side-trips from Tokyo: Maihama (Tokyo Disneyland, Tokyo DisneySea, &more). There's lots more to do: don't miss a visit to Meiji Jingu Shrine, admire the natural beauty at Shinjuku Gyoen National Garden, visit Ginza, and examine the collection at Meiji Jingu Museum.

To see photos and more tourist information, go to the Tokyo holiday builder.

You can drive from Saitama to Tokyo in an hour. Alternatively, you can take a train. In December, daily temperatures in Tokyo can reach 14°C, while at night they dip to 4°C. Wrap up your sightseeing by early afternoon on the 30th (Wed) to allow enough time to fly back home.

Things to do in Tokyo

Theme Parks · Parks · Shopping · Historic Sites

Side Trip

Nagano Prefecture travel guide

3.9
Ski Areas · Sacred & Religious Sites · Castles
Nagano Prefecture is a landlocked prefecture of Japan located in the Chūbu region on the island of Honshu. The capital is the city of Nagano. Due to the abundance of mountain ranges in this area, the land available for inhabitance is relatively limited.Nagano has impressive highland areas, including most of the Kita-Alps, Chūō-Alps, and Minami-Alps, which extend into the neighbouring prefectures. In addition to its natural scenic beauty and rich history, Nagano was host to the 1998 Winter Olympics, which gained the prefecture international recognition as a world-class winter sport destination, and a Shinkansen line to Tokyo.HistorySee Shinano Province.

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Aomori Prefecture travel guide

4.1
Bodies of Water · Architectural Buildings · Specialty Museums
Aomori Prefecture is a prefecture of Japan located in the Tōhoku region. The capital is the city of Aomori.HistoryUntil the Meiji Restoration, the area of Aomori prefecture was known as the northern part of Mutsu Province.During the Edo period the Hirosaki clan began building a seaport at the current city of Aomori. There were green woods near the city which were used as landmarks for the ships that came into port. These green woods called aoi-mori is where Aomori got its name. The prefecture came into existence in 1871. The town of Aomori was established in 1889. The town was incorporated as a city in 1898 with a population of 28,000. On May 3, 1910, a fire broke out in the Yasukata district. Fanned by strong winds, the fire quickly devastated the whole city. The conflagration claimed 26 lives and injured a further 160 residents. It destroyed 5,246 houses and burnt 19 storage sheds and 157 warehouses. At 10:30 p.m. on July 28, 1945, a squadron of American B29 bombers bombed over 90% of the city.Radio Aomori (RAB) made its first broadcast in 1951. Four years later, the first fish auctions were held. 1958 saw the completion of the Municipal Fish Market as well as the opening of the Citizen's Hospital. In the same year, the Tsugaru Line established a rail connection with Minmaya Village at the tip of the peninsula.

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Iwate Prefecture travel guide

3.9
Sacred & Religious Sites · Landmarks · Specialty Museums
Iwate Prefecture is a prefecture in the Tōhoku region of Japan. Located on the main island of Honshu, it contains the island's easternmost point. The capital is Morioka. Iwate has the lowest population density of any prefecture outside Hokkaido. Famous attractions include the Buddhist temples of Hiraizumi, including Chūson-ji and Mōtsū-ji with their treasures, Fujiwara no Sato, a movie lot and theme park in Esashi Ward, Oshu City, Tenshochi, a park in Kitakami City known for its big, old cherry trees and Morioka Castle in Morioka City.NameThere are several theories about the origin of the name "Iwate", but the most well known is the tale Oni no tegata, which is associated with the Mitsuishi or "Three Rocks" Shrine in Morioka. These rocks are said to have been thrown down into Morioka by an eruption of Mt. Iwate. According to the legend, there was once a devil who often tormented and harassed the local people. When the people prayed to the spirits of Mitsuishi for protection, the devil was immediately shackled to these rocks and forced to make a promise never to trouble the people again. As a seal of his oath, the devil made a handprint on one of the rocks, thus giving rise to the name Iwate, literally "rock hand". Even now after a rainfall it is said that the devil's hand print can still be seen there.

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Akita Prefecture travel guide

3.9
Specialty Museums · Bodies of Water · Historic Walking Areas
Akita Prefecture is a prefecture located in the Tōhoku region of Japan. The capital is the city of Akita.HistoryThe area of Akita has been created from the ancient provinces of Dewa and Mutsu.Separated from the principal Japanese centres of commerce, politics, and population by several hundred kilometres and the Ōu and Dewa mountain ranges to the east, Akita remained largely isolated from Japanese society until after the year 600. Akita was a region of hunter-gatherers and principally nomadic tribes.The first historical record of what is now Akita Prefecture dates to 658, when the Abe no Hirafu conquered the native Ezo tribes at what are now the cities of Akita and Noshiro. Hirafu, then governor of Koshi Province (the northwest part of Honshū bordering the Sea of Japan), established a fort on the Mogami River, and thus began the Japanese settlement of the region.In 733, a new military settlement—later renamed Akita Castle—was built in modern-day Akita city at Takashimizu, and more permanent roads and structures were developed. The region was used as a base of operations for the Japanese empire as it drove the native Ezo people from northern Honshū.It shifted hands several times. During the Tokugawa shogunate it was appropriated to the Satake clan, who ruled the region for 260 years, developing the agriculture and mining industries that are still predominant today. Throughout this period, it was classified as part of Dewa Province. In 1871, during the Meiji Restoration, Dewa Province was reshaped and the old daimyō domains were abolished and administratively reconstructed, resulting in the modern-day borders of Akita.

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Miyagi Prefecture travel guide

4
Sacred & Religious Sites · Landmarks · Castles
Miyagi Prefecture is a prefecture of Japan in the Tōhoku region on Honshu island. The capital is Sendai.

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Niigata Prefecture travel guide

3.9
Ski Areas · Sacred & Religious Sites · Landmarks
Niigata Prefecture is a prefecture of Japan located on the island of Honshu on the coast of the Sea of Japan. The capital is the city of Niigata with which it shares the same name.HistoryUntil after the Meiji Restoration, the area that is now Niigata Prefecture was divided into Echigo Province (on the mainland) and Sado Province. During the Sengoku period, the Nagao clan, who were at times vassals to the Uesugi, ruled a fief in the western part of modern Niigata from Kasugayama Castle. The most notable member of the Nagao clan was Nagao Kagetora, later and better known as Uesugi Kenshin. He unified the leaders of Echigo Province and became its sole ruler. By taking the surname Uesugi, he also became the head of the Uesugi clan and effectively brought their realm under his control.The city of Niigata is now the third largest Japanese city facing the Sea of Japan, after Fukuoka and Kitakyushu. It was the first Japanese port on the Sea of Japan to be opened to foreign trade following the opening of Japan by Matthew Perry. It has since played an important role in trade with Russia and Korea. A freighter from North Korea visits Niigata once a month, in one of the few forms of direct contact between Japan and that country.

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Fukushima Prefecture travel guide

3.8
Landmarks · Castles · Bodies of Water
Fukushima Prefecture is a prefecture of Japan located in the Tōhoku region on the island of Honshu. The capital is the city of Fukushima.HistoryUntil the Meiji Restoration, the area of Fukushima prefecture was part of what was known as Mutsu Province.The Shirakawa Barrier and the Nakoso Barrier were built around the 5th century to protect 'civilized Japan' from the 'barbarians' to the north. Fukushima became a Province of Mutsu after the Taika Reforms were established in 646.In 718, the provinces of Iwase and Iwaki were created, but these areas reverted to Mutsu some time between 722 and 724.The province of Fukushima was conquered by Prince Subaru in 1293. This region of Japan is also known as Michinoku and Ōshū.The Fukushima Incident took place in the prefecture after Mishima Michitsune was appointed governor in 1882.2011 earthquake and subsequent disastersThe 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami and the resulting Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster caused significant damage to the prefecture, primarily but not limited to the eastern Hama-dōri region.

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Ibaraki Prefecture travel guide

4
Sacred & Religious Sites · Playgrounds · Landmarks
Ibaraki Prefecture is a prefecture of Japan, located in the Kantō region on the main island of Honshu. The capital is Mito.HistoryIbaraki Prefecture was previously known as Hitachi Province. In 1871, the name of the province became Ibaraki.

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Saitama Prefecture travel guide

3.8
Sacred & Religious Sites · Parks · Landmarks
Saitama Prefecture is a landlocked prefecture of Japan located in the Kantō region of the island of Honshu. The capital is the city of Saitama.This prefecture is part of the Greater Tokyo Area, and most of Saitama's cities can be described as suburbs of Tokyo, to which a large number of residents commute each day.HistoryAccording to Sendai Kuji Hongi, Chichibu was one of 137 provinces during the reign of Emperor Sujin. Chichibu Province was in western Saitama.Saitama Prefecture was formerly part of the old Musashi Province.In the fifth year of the Keiun era, deposits of copper were reported to have been found in the Chichibu District of what is now Saitama Prefecture.The Saitama area was historically known as a fertile agricultural region which produced much of the food for the Kantō region. During the Edo period, many fudai daimyōs ruled small domains within the Saitama area.After World War II, as Tokyo expanded rapidly and modern transportation allowed longer commutes, the lack of available land in Tokyo led to the rapid development of Saitama Prefecture, where the population has nearly tripled since 1960. Most of the cities in the prefecture are closely connected to downtown Tokyo by metropolitan rail, and operate largely as residential and commercial suburbs of Tokyo.

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