11 days in Continental USA Itinerary

11 days in Continental USA Itinerary

Created using Inspirock United States vacation planner

Make it your trip
Drive
1
Hot Springs
— 1 day
Drive
2
Branson
Drive
3
Chicago
— 1 night
Drive
4
Indianapolis
— 1 night
Drive
5
Detroit
— 1 night
Drive
6
Cleveland
— 1 night
Drive
7
Louisville
— 1 day
Drive
8
Pigeon Forge
— 3 nights
Drive

S M T W T F S
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Hot Springs

— 1 day

Valley of the Vapors

Set deep in the Ouachita Mountains, the city of Hot Springs almost completely surrounds the national park of the same name.
You've now added Anthony Chapel to your itinerary. Kick off your visit on the 25th (Sun): take in panoramic vistas at Hot Springs Mountain Tower, stop by Bathhouse Soapery, contemplate the long history of Fordyce Bathhouse, then pause for some serene contemplation at Anthony Chapel, and finally admire the natural beauty at Garvan Woodland Gardens.

To see maps, more things to do, where to stay, and more tourist information, refer to the Hot Springs driving holiday planner.

Jonesboro to Hot Springs is an approximately 3-hour car ride. In July, daily temperatures in Hot Springs can reach 92°F, while at night they dip to 72°F. Finish your sightseeing early on the 25th (Sun) so you can drive to Branson.

Things to do in Hot Springs

Parks · Historic Sites · Shopping

Branson

Live Entertainment Capital of the World

Nestled in Missouri's beautiful Ozark Mountains lies one of the country's most attractive vacation towns for year-round family entertainment.
To find reviews, other places to visit, more things to do, and other tourist information, use the Branson trip itinerary app.

Drive from Hot Springs to Branson in 5 hours. Alternatively, you can do a combination of taxi and bus. When traveling from Hot Springs in July, plan for little chillier days and about the same nights in Branson: temperatures range from 87°F by day to 68°F at night. You will leave for Chicago on the 25th (Sun).

Things to do in Branson

Nightlife · Parks · Outdoors · Shopping

Chicago

— 1 night

Windy City

A huge and vibrant city, Chicago is home to top-notch theaters, shops, museums, galleries, and restaurants.
Start off your visit on the 26th (Mon): meet the residents at Lincoln Park Zoo, ponder the design of Buckingham Fountain, then explore the world behind art at The Art Institute of Chicago, and finally walk around Millennium Park. On the 27th (Tue), you'll have a packed day of sightseeing: take in panoramic vistas at Skydeck Chicago - Willis Tower, engage your brain at Museum of Science and Industry, then observe the fascinating underwater world at Shedd Aquarium, and finally stroll around Milton Lee Olive Park.

To find maps, where to stay, more things to do, and other tourist information, refer to the Chicago attractions site.

Traveling by flight from Branson to Chicago takes 3 hours. Alternatively, you can drive; or do a combination of taxi, bus, and train. In July, plan for daily highs up to 83°F, and evening lows to 67°F. Finish your sightseeing early on the 27th (Tue) to allow enough time to fly to Indianapolis.

Things to do in Chicago

Parks · Museums · Zoos & Aquariums · Childrens Museums

Indianapolis

— 1 night

Circle City

Indiana's capital and most populous city, Indianapolis is best known for its racecar events and impressive museums, and as the hometown of Kurt Vonnegut.
On the 28th (Wed), get to know the resident critters at Indianapolis Zoo, explore the engaging exhibits at Children's Museum of Indianapolis, and then make a trip to USS Indianapolis Memorial.

To find where to stay, ratings, maps, and more tourist information, refer to the Indianapolis travel itinerary planner.

You can fly from Chicago to Indianapolis in 2.5 hours. Other options are to drive; or take a bus. The time zone difference moving from Central Standard Time (CST) to Eastern Standard Time (EST) is 1 hour. Expect a daytime high around 83°F in July, and nighttime lows around 65°F. Finish your sightseeing early on the 28th (Wed) so you can fly to Detroit.

Things to do in Indianapolis

Zoos & Aquariums · Parks · Childrens Museums · Museums

Detroit

— 1 night

The Motor City

Founded in 1701 by a French explorer and adventurer, Detroit exerted a profound impact on the world for most of the 20th century.
Start off your visit on the 29th (Thu): examine the collection at The Ford Piquette Avenue Plant, take a leisurely stroll along Detroit RiverFront, then head off the coast to Belle Isle Park, and finally steep yourself in history at Motown Museum.

For maps, other places to visit, more things to do, and tourist information, go to the Detroit day trip planner.

Traveling by flight from Indianapolis to Detroit takes 3 hours. Alternatively, you can drive; or take a bus. In July, daily temperatures in Detroit can reach 82°F, while at night they dip to 65°F. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 29th (Thu) so you can catch the flight to Cleveland.

Things to do in Detroit

Museums · Historic Sites · Nature · Parks

Cleveland

— 1 night

Forest City

A culturally diverse city situated on the shores of Lake Erie, Cleveland boasts many places to visit, such as world-class museums, popular amusement parks, and sprawling recreational areas.
Kick off your visit on the 30th (Fri): brush up on your military savvy at Cuyahoga County Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, meet the residents at Cleveland Metroparks Zoo, then get up close and personal with brilliant marine life at Greater Cleveland Aquarium, and finally admire the masterpieces at The Cleveland Museum of Art.

For more things to do, ratings, traveler tips, and other tourist information, read our Cleveland trip planner.

You can fly from Detroit to Cleveland in 2.5 hours. Alternatively, you can drive; or take a bus. In July in Cleveland, expect temperatures between 79°F during the day and 68°F at night. Cap off your sightseeing on the 30th (Fri) early enough to catch the flight to Louisville.

Things to do in Cleveland

Zoos & Aquariums · Parks · Museums

Louisville

— 1 day

Derby City

Kentucky’s largest city, Louisville, is best known as the home of the Kentucky Derby.
On the 31st (Sat), examine the collection at Louisville Slugger Museum & Factory, then look for gifts at Art Eatables, then learn about wildlife with up-close encounters at Louisville Zoo, and finally Head underground at Louisville Mega Cavern.

To find maps, more things to do, and tourist information, use the Louisville road trip planning website.

You can fly from Cleveland to Louisville in 5 hours. Alternatively, you can drive; or take a bus. Expect somewhat warmer weather when traveling from Cleveland in July: highs in Louisville hover around 87°F, while lows dip to 69°F. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 31st (Sat) to allow time to drive to Pigeon Forge.

Things to do in Louisville

Parks · Nature · Zoos & Aquariums · Museums

Pigeon Forge

— 3 nights

Center of Fun in the Smokies

A tiny town with big tourist appeal, Pigeon Forge bills itself as the "Center of Fun in the Smokies." Just a short drive from the national park protecting the diverse plant and animal life of the Great Smoky Mountains, the town features numerous places to visit, such as bars, restaurants, cafes, theaters, and shops.
Start off your visit on the 1st (Sun): get outside with Outdoor Activities, relax and float downstream with a rafting and tubing tour, and then see the interesting displays at Titanic Museum Attraction. Get ready for a full day of sightseeing on the next day: catch some excitement at Rocky Top Mountain Coaster and then find something for the whole family at Dollywood.

For photos, other places to visit, reviews, and other tourist information, go to the Pigeon Forge journey planning website.

Traveling by car from Louisville to Pigeon Forge takes 5 hours. Alternatively, you can fly; or do a combination of bus, subway, and car. Expect a daytime high around 87°F in July, and nighttime lows around 69°F. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 3rd (Tue) early enough to fly back home.

Things to do in Pigeon Forge

Theme Parks · Tours · Outdoors · Adventure

Side Trip

Arkansas travel guide

4.5
State Parks · Art Museums · Sacred & Religious Sites
The Natural State
With a diverse geography including mountains in the north, dense broadleaf forests in the south, and fertile lowlands in the east, Arkansas is aptly nicknamed the "Natural State." Still largely undiscovered by foreign tourists, the state hides a world of little-known lakes and rivers. Arkansas also includes vast state parks, offering visitors on vacation outstanding camping facilities in the middle of pristine natural areas sheltering blue herons, warblers, and bald eagles. Often stereotyped as little more than poor hillbilly country, Arkansas boasts a surprisingly diverse array of cultural attractions, including numerous museums, theaters, and cutting-edge sports venues. To learn about the real culture of Arkansas, explore its outstanding cuisine, traditional festivals, and lively music scene.

Missouri travel guide

4.6
Theaters · Performances · Specialty Museums
The Show-Me State
Acquired from France as part of the famous Louisiana Purchase, Missouri offers visitors equal amounts of urban and rural tourist attractions, with a good sprinkling of lush valleys and meandering back roads ideal for leisurely road trips. The state has a highly varied geography, ranging from the till plains in the north to the rolling Ozark Mountains in the south. The state sits at the intersection of North America's three greatest rivers, creating fertile plains known for supporting extensive farms and ranches. Now generally considered part of the country's Midwest, most people used to count Missouri among the southern states, primarily due to its status as a slave state before the Civil War.

Illinois travel guide

4.4
Observation Decks · Parks · Art Museums
The Prairie State
The most populous state in the country's Midwest region, Illinois features a diverse landscape that includes both the enormous urban sprawl of Chicago and flat central plains, devoted almost entirely to farmland. With a great selection of things to do, Chicago is the state's centerpiece, featuring world-famous architecture and renowned museums. Farther away from this giant urban center, you can explore historical landmarks dedicated to local heroes Abraham Lincoln and Ernest Hemingway. The state also includes a prehistoric Native American site, one of only 20 World Heritage Sites in the United States, a unique feature well-worth adding to your itinerary.

Indiana travel guide

4.1
Casinos · Room Escape Games · Specialty Museums
The Hoosier State
With an extensive history of motorsports, Indiana's main claim to fame is the popular automobile race held each year in its capital city. A mostly rural state, Indiana is a land of till plains and lakes, its appearance a result of traces left behind by receding glaciers. The central section of the state, mostly flat with some rolling hills, contains some of the country's most fertile farmland. The state also contains almost 39,000 km (24,000 mi) of waterways, including the Wabash River, the longest free-flowing river east of the Mississippi. For a genuine "Hoosier" experience, tour the state's slow-paced small towns, noted for their hospitality and outstanding local cuisine. You'll remember the warmth and charm long after your vacation is over.

Michigan travel guide

4.7
Specialty Museums · Gift & Specialty Shops · State Parks
Great Lakes State
A state inextricably tied to its waterways, Michigan does water activities better than almost any other place in the country. Things to do in the state include numerous opportunities to swim, fish, sail, motorboat, and canoe. The country's only state to stretch over two peninsulas, Michigan features a long freshwater coastline. In a land of nearly 65,000 inland lakes and ponds, you can never be too far from a natural water source. Michigan's major claim to fame is its status as the center of the U.S. automotive industry, with the Detroit metropolitan area housing the country's three major car manufacturers. The city is also a major center of culture, the birthplace of the Motown Sound, and the home of several museums and other tourist attractions. Farther from the big urban centers, Michigan offers visitors a world of apple and cherry orchards, rustic villages, and picturesque vineyards.

Ohio travel guide

4.2
Specialty Museums · Casinos · Water Parks
The Buckeye State
Nicknamed the "Heart of It All" because of its heart-like shape, Ohio is perhaps best described as a mosaic of big cities and small towns, with vast tracts of farmland in between. Always a major industrial and political player in the country, the state was the home to eight American presidents and the Wright brothers, inventors of the airplane. The first man to walk on the Moon came from Ohio, as did 23 other astronauts. More than just an overachiever in science, industry, and politics, the state is also a serious holiday destination, featuring both traditional Amish farms and bustling cities with a great selection of things to do.

Kentucky travel guide

4.5
Caves · Specialty Museums · Distilleries
The Bluegrass State
A diverse region of sprawling farmland and rich cultural heritage, Kentucky is the birthplace of American horse racing and home to the world-famous Kentucky Derby. While the cities of Lexington and Louisville experience the majority of the state's tourism, Kentucky is also a favorite among outdoor enthusiasts with its array of natural attractions, including the Cumberland Gap and the world's longest cave system at Mammoth Cave National Park. Take a tour through original Civil War battlefields to delve into the nation's history, or head to one of the many bourbon distilleries to learn more about Kentucky's most famous export.

Tennessee travel guide

4.4
Specialty Museums · Distilleries · Theme Parks
The Volunteer State
Divided by law, geography, and custom into three major regions, represented by the three stars on state's flag, Tennessee boasts a distinctive musical heritage that includes elements of bluegrass, country-western, and blues. With a countryside as diverse as its people, Tennessee includes landscapes ranging from a mountainous region in the east to the lowlands of the west, with gently rolling hills in the middle. For a well-rounded vacation, you can hike remote mountain trails in the morning and explore the crowded bars of Nashville in the evening. Visit the urban attractions, such as Elvis Presley's former residence in Memphis, but don't miss a chance to spend some time in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, situated in the eastern part of the state.