10 days in Japan Itinerary

10 days in Japan Itinerary

Created using Inspirock Japan route planner

Make it your trip
Fly
1
Tokyo
— 1 night
Train
2
Izu
— 1 night
Train
3
Kyoto
— 5 nights
Train
4
Okayama
— 2 nights
Train to Chūbu Centrair, Fly to Jakarta

S M T W T F S
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Tokyo

— 1 night
Tokyo holds the status of most populous metropolitan area in the world--a fact you'll find tangible as you walk the bustling streets and explore its diverse neighborhoods and cultures.
Kick off your visit on the 2nd (Mon): gear up at Asakusa Samurai Ai Armor Experience, then take in the spiritual surroundings of Senso-ji Temple, then get interesting insight from Street Kart Tour Akihabara #1 by Go-Kart, and finally take a memorable excursion with ►► Withlocals™ - Local Private Tours 🇯🇵.

To find maps, where to stay, traveler tips, and other tourist information, read Tokyo route builder site.

Jakarta, Indonesia to Tokyo is an approximately 10.5-hour flight. Traveling from Jakarta to Tokyo, you'll lose 2 hours due to the time zone difference. In November, Tokyo is much colder than Jakarta - with highs of 19°C and lows of 11°C. Finish your sightseeing early on the 2nd (Mon) so you can drive to Izu.

Things to do in Tokyo

Outdoors · Tours · Historic Sites · Wineries

Izu

— 1 night
Izu sits in the center of the mountainous Izu Peninsula.
Start off your visit on the 3rd (Tue): take in the awesome beauty at Mt. Daruma, get outside with Nishiizu Skyline, soak in some Japanese tradition at some of the top local onsens, then look for all kinds of wild species at Wasabi Fields of Ikadaba, and finally indulge your thirst for a good beer at Baird Brewery Gardens Shusenji.

To find reviews, ratings, other places to visit, and more tourist information, you can read our Izu trip planner.

You can drive from Tokyo to Izu in 2.5 hours. Alternatively, you can take a train; or do a combination of bus and train. Traveling from Tokyo in November, plan for somewhat warmer nights in Izu, with lows around 17°C. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 3rd (Tue) so you can catch the flight to Kyoto.

Things to do in Izu

Parks · Nature · Baths · Spas

Kyoto

— 5 nights
The national capital for over a thousand years, Kyoto retains much of the charm of old Japan, boasting numerous temples and shrines that seem completely untouched by the modern world.
Get some cultural insight at Fushimi Inari-taisha Shrine and Nijo Castle. Your inner history buff will appreciate Kinkaku-ji and Osaka Castle. Explore the numerous day-trip ideas around Kyoto: Dotombori District (in Dotombori) and Akamon Oneribei (in Nishinomiya). The adventure continues: contemplate the long history of Kiyomizu-dera Temple, take in the spiritual surroundings of Sanjusangendo Temple, browse the eclectic array of goods at Nishiki Market Shopping District, and cast your line with Hero Tour Japan.

To see traveler tips, other places to visit, photos, and tourist information, use the Kyoto trip planner.

You can take a train from Izu to Kyoto in 3.5 hours. Alternatively, you can fly; or take a train; or drive. Traveling from Izu in November, expect a bit cooler with lows of 10°C in Kyoto. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 8th (Sun) early enough to take a train to Okayama.

Things to do in Kyoto

Historic Sites · Neighborhoods · Shopping · Spas

Side Trips

Okayama

— 2 nights
A major transit hub in western Japan, Okayama provides a convenient mid-point between Kyoto, Osaka, and Hiroshima.
On the 9th (Mon), step into the grandiose world of Okayama Castle, take in nature's colorful creations at Okayama Korakuen Garden, then take in the spiritual surroundings of Kibitsu Shrine, and finally grab your bike and head to Kibi Plain Bicycle Route.

To see where to stay, photos, other places to visit, and more tourist information, read Okayama online vacation builder.

Getting from Kyoto to Okayama by train takes about 2 hours. Other options: take a train; or drive; or take a bus. Expect a daytime high around 17°C in November, and nighttime lows around 7°C. Cap off your sightseeing on the 10th (Tue) early enough to travel back home.

Things to do in Okayama

Parks · Historic Sites · Outdoors · Trails

Side Trip

Japan travel guide

4.3
Sacred & Religious Sites · Landmarks · Historic Sites
Land of the Rising Sun
Part of a volcanic archipelago that encompasses over 6,800 islands, Japan remains one of Asia's most fascinating tourist destinations, where a blend of modernity and tradition creates a look and feel completely different from any other place in the world. A tour of Japan lets you discover big cities filled with ancient temples and innovative skyscrapers, as well as quiet country landscapes dotted with castles, perfectly manicured gardens, cherry orchards, and primeval forests seemingly untouched by the hand of mass tourism. Many tourists on vacation in Japan devote lots of time to the country's unique cuisine, prepared with painstaking attention to detail and a genius for simple yet effective presentation.

Shizuoka Prefecture travel guide

3.7
Sacred & Religious Sites · Landmarks · Parks
Shizuoka Prefecture is a prefecture of Japan located in the Chūbu region of Honshu. The capital is the city of Shizuoka, while Hamamatsu is the largest city by population.HistoryShizuoka Prefecture was formed from the former Tōtōmi, Suruga and Izu provinces.The area was the home of the first Tokugawa Shogun. Tokugawa Ieyasu held the region until he conquered the lands of the Hōjō clan in the Kantō region and placed land under the stewardship of Toyotomi Hideyoshi. After becoming shogun, Tokugawa took the land back for his family and put the area around modern-day Shizuoka city under the direct supervision of the shogunate. With the creation of Shizuoka han in 1868, it once again became the residence of the Tokugawa family.GeographyShizuoka Prefecture is an elongated region following the coast of the Pacific Ocean at the Suruga Bay. In the west, the prefecture extends deep into the Japan Alps. In the east, it becomes a narrower coast bounded in the north by Mount Fuji, until it comes to the Izu Peninsula, a popular resort area pointing south into the Pacific.

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Kyoto Prefecture travel guide

4.3
Historic Sites · Sacred & Religious Sites · Landmarks
Kyoto Prefecture is a prefecture of Japan in the Kansai region of the island of Honshu. The capital is the city of Kyoto.HistoryUntil the Meiji Restoration, the area of Kyoto Prefecture was known as Yamashiro.For most of its history, the city of Kyoto was Japan's Imperial capital. The city's history can be traced back as far as the 6th century. In 544, the Aoi Matsuri was held in Kyoto to pray for good harvest and good weather.Kyoto did not start out as Japan's capital. A noteworthy earlier capital was Nara. In 741, Emperor Shōmu moved the capital briefly to Kuni-kyo, between the cities of Nara and Kyoto, in present-day Kyoto Prefecture. In 784, the capital was moved to Nagaokakyō, also in present-day Kyoto Prefecture. In 794, Emperor Kanmu moved the capital to Heian-kyo, and this was the beginning of the current-day city of Kyoto. Even today, almost all of the streets, houses, stores, temples and shrines in Kyoto exist where they were placed in this year.Although in 1192 real political power shifted to Kamakura, where a samurai clan established the shogunate, Kyoto remained the imperial capital as the powerless emperors and their court continued to be seated in the city. Imperial rule was briefly restored in 1333, but another samurai clan established a new shogunate in Kyoto three years later.

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Okayama Prefecture travel guide

3.8
Gardens · Sacred & Religious Sites · Historic Walking Areas
Okayama Prefecture is a prefecture of Japan located in the Chūgoku region on the main island of Honshu. The capital is the city of Okayama.HistoryPrior to the Meiji Restoration of 1868, the area of present-day Okayama Prefecture was divided between Bitchū, Bizen and Mimasaka Provinces. Okayama Prefecture was formed and named in 1871 as part of the large-scale administrative reforms of the early Meiji period (1868–1912), and the borders of the prefecture were set in 1876.GeographyOkayama Prefecture borders Hyōgo Prefecture, Tottori Prefecture, and Hiroshima Prefecture. It faces Kagawa Prefecture in Shikoku across the Seto Inland Sea and includes 90 islands in the sea.Okayama Prefecture is home to the historic town of Kurashiki. Most of the population is concentrated around Kurashiki and Okayama. The small villages in the northern mountain region are aging and declining in population - more than half of the prefectures municipalities are officially designated as depopulated.

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