Dublin Unitarian Church, Dublin

4.2
We are a vibrant and lively congregation of people of all backgrounds and ages who worship together in a beautiful 19th century church on St. Stephen’s Green in the centre of Dublin city.The church was built as a Unitarian church in 1863 but Unitarians in Dublin, ( known at different times as Non Conformists / Dissenters / Presbyterians) are descendants of several congregations which had 'Meeting Houses' in the city since the mid-1600's.

Our bond of union is religious sympathy, not the declaration of a creed-bound faith. In the love of truth and in the spirit of Christ, we unite for the worship of God and the service of our fellows.

The following text has been the motto of our church for many years:

"Love is the doctrine of this church, the quest of truth is its sacrament and service is its prayer. To dwell together in peace. To seek knowledge in freedom. To serve humankind in fellowship to the end that all souls shall grow in harmony with the divine. This do we covenant with each other and with God."

The church is an eco-congregation and has been awarded a Fairtrade Certificate.

On our website at www.dublinunitarianchurch.org, you can find details of our services, a map to help you find us, a history of our church and of Unitarianism in Dublin, information about our fundraising campaign for the restoration of the church organ and links to other useful sites. Details on our rites of passage services – baptisms, weddings and funerals – are also available.
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Dublin Unitarian Church Reviews
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  • This is the church I found walking near St. Stephens Green. The unusual design that is deliberately asymmetric draws the eye. It seems to have chosen it in the architectural competition, and it seems to have been built without being bound because it is a Unitarian sect.
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  • This Unitarian church was designed by W.H.Lynn for an architectural competition in 1863 which he won. The design is intended to bring as much light into the interior of a constricted site. The stained...  more »
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  • Lovely secular wedding. Messages on the stained glass were very neutral
  • The Unitarian Church in Ireland presently consists of two Congregations, Dublin and Cork, part of the Synod of Munster, in the Republic of Ireland, which has itself been part the Non-Subscribing Presbyterian Church of Ireland since 1935. Some congregations remain closely associated with the General Assembly of Unitarian and Free Christian Churches. These churches would abide by the traditional Unitarian principles of Freedom, Reason and Tolerance Unitarianism in Ireland dates back to the 1600s with early recorded communities in Dublin and Bandon, Co. Cork, it has its roots in the Puritan Non-Conformist / Dissenters who did not subscribe to established church doctrines, like Westminister Confession. Unitarianism was illegal up until 1813.[1] In 1809 the Synod of Munster was founded when the non-subscribing presbyteries Dublin and others in the South of Ireland came together. In 1830 the Irish Unitarian Society (for the Diffusion of Christian Knowledge) now the Irish Unitarian Christian Society was formed. Among its founders was Rev. Dr. James Armstrong, who promoted Unitarianism particularly in the South of Ireland by publishing books and other works. In 1835 the Association of Non-Subscribing Presbyteries was formed.[2] In 1910 the Non-subscribing Presbyterian Church of Ireland was formally established with the merger of the Antrim Presbytery and Remonstrant Synod of Ulster. In 1935 the Unitarian Synod of Munster joined the Non-subscribing Presbyterian Church of Ireland. Former communities and churches In the past there were Unitarian communities in Clonmel, Co. Tipperary, as early as 1666, who met from 1789 to 1924 at the Unitarian Chapel (built in 1838) in Wellington Street,[4] and Bandon, as early as the 1600s but met at the Unitarian Presbyterian Church, built by Rev. Edward King, sometimes called The Old Preaching House or The Seekers Church, in Bandon, from 1813 to 1908. It became a bakery and more recently an agricultural supplies store. There were also communities in Tipperary Town and a Presbyterian (Unitarian) Church in Fethard. Prior to being based in Stephens Green, Unitarians had premises in Wood Street which moved to Strand Street in 1764, Cook Street joined Strand Street in 1787, and New Row which moved to Eustace Street in Dublin, the Eustace Street and Strand Street Congregations merged to form the new Dublin Unitarian Church on Stephens Green
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