Trip Planner:   Europe  /  Iceland  /  West Region  /  Borgarbyggd  /  Borgarnes  /  Aurora Borealis

Aurora Borealis, Borgarnes

4.5
#8 of 8 in Wildlife in West Region
Nature / Park · Hidden Gem · Wildlife Area
Aurora Borealis is located in Borgarnes. For travelers who use our international travel planner, Borgarnes holidays become easier to arrange, with trips to the Aurora Borealis and other attractions mapped out and timetabled.
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Aurora Borealis reviews

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TripAdvisor traveler rating 5.0
4 reviews
Google
5.0
TripAdvisor
  • Family birthday present for my 60th. We Saw the northern lights after a great dinner on our way back to our hotel. great experience.  more »
  • I had the pleasure to visit the Aurora Centre to see the Northern Lights on huge screen with in-dept information about the Northern Lights. The show included many great video scenes in high...  more »
Google
  • The word "aurora" is derived from the name of the Roman goddess of the dawn, Aurora, who traveled from east to west announcing the coming of the sun. Ancient Roman poets used the name metaphorically to refer to dawn, often mentioning its play of colours across the otherwise dark sky (e.g., "rosy fingered dawn"). Aurora borealis is a natural electrical phenomenon characterized by the appearance of streamers of reddish or greenish light in the sky, especially near the northern or southern magnetic pole. The effect is caused by the interaction of charged particles from the sun with atoms in the upper atmosphere. In northern and southern regions it is respectively called aurora borealis or Northern Lights and aurora australis or Southern Lights. The resulting ionization and excitation of atmospheric constituents emits light of varying color and complexity. The form of the aurora, occurring within bands around both polar regions, is also dependent on the amount of acceleration imparted to the precipitating particles. Precipitating protons generally produce optical emissions as incident hydrogen atoms after gaining electrons from the atmosphere. Proton auroras are usually observed at lower latitudes.
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