Belgian Comic Strip Center, Brussels

2.7
#11 of 84 in Museums in Brussels
Walk through the history of Tintin at the Belgian Comic Strip Center, which celebrates the art of the comic. The center is housed inside a former department store designed by Art Nouveau architect Victor Horta, whose great glass ceiling lets in enough natural light to illuminate the museum galleries. Exhibits showcase French, English, and Dutch comic art from its earliest days to the present. An extensive Tintin exhibit is the main attraction with the history of the artwork and its creator, and even life-size models of the characters. Browse copies of some of Europe's best-known comics and graphic novels in the reading room and library. A self-guided tour is the most popular way to explore the building and the exhibits, because information about each exhibit is available in multiple languages. Put Belgian Comic Strip Center into our Brussels day trip planning site and find out what's close by, where to stay, and where to head next.
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Belgian Comic Strip Center Reviews
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1,910 reviews
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  • This museum really has a lot to offer and a visit is a must if you are in Brussels! The path inside the museum is divided into two parts, if so you can define, since there is no real obligatory path to follow; however, the first part is introductory and concerns the explanation of the appearance of the first comics, and subsequently their development has brought this new form of expression to a real ninth art, and as a result all the features and elements that involve the writing of a comic as well as all comic genres, all accompanied by examples and original boards of different characters, stories, artists and styles. The upper floor is divided into areas, each of which details the most famous comics, complete with reproductions of settings such as the House of the Smurfs; the part about Tintin is done really well, with the psychological explanation of the roles of each character, the settings and the story. There are prints at least 1X1 m in size, and gorgeous boards, reproductions of books by giants, 1.5 meters high with the boards of the different comics. The museum is also very enjoyable for non-enthusiasts, and also enjoys excellent lighting thanks to the design of the palace, designed by Victor Horta, exponent of Belgian Art Nouveau. This museum has much to offer and if you find yourself in Brussels, a visit is a must! The path inside the museum is divided in two, even if there's no clear path in it, it is just about two different floors with two different "themes": the first floor concerns an introduction to the first comics published, but then, thanks to its involving power , this new kind of expression evolved and spread so much that became the so-called Ninth Art, and so all the characteristics and elements that the realisation of a comic implies, as well as all the genres developed (such as sci-fi, adventure, mystery and so on), are well explained, followed by examples and original comics from different authors with different styles. The second floor is divided into areas, each of them concerns a specific comic, in order to explain the major ones in a very detailed way. There are also reproductions of some location, just as the house of Smurf; the area about Tintin is very well realized, with the psychologic explanation of the role of every character, even the dog Milou. In the museum you can also find reproductions of books, in particular comics, with the height of a person and big drawing board, like 1x1 meter. This museum is very pleasant and enjoyable, and I'd recommend it, even if you're not fond of comics; moreover, it enjoys perfect light thanks to the project of the building, based on a drawing of Victor Horta, the famous exponent of the Belgian Art Nouveau. (I hope I didn't reveal spoiler that much!)
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  • We had negative echoes of this museum: too technical, too much to read and well... Fortunately, we didn't stop there. The whole family loved: a dive into the world of comics, these universes, its world, methods... A journey into the world of childhood, ball and bill (Roba) tintin (Hergé), Peyo... I took a slap, so it was good! Don't go to the reading room at the end of the visit.
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